SCCi leases the William R. Halliday Cave Preserve located in Hart County, Kentucky. The property is comprised of approximately 40 acres of wooded land located on the side of Northtown Ridge near Mammoth Cave, Kentucky. The property contains Logsdon Cave, a wet multi-drop cave. The entrance is a vertical shaft approximately 35 feet deep which enters a crawl to a series of 8 drops from 15 to 60 feet in depth. The cave is over 200 feet deep, approximately 500 feet long and is very close to known passage in Fisher Ridge Cave.
The Nashville Grotto currently manages this preserve, and a permit is required to enter the cave. Each party must have someone on the trip who is an approved Logsdon Cave Trip Leader. A small campsite is present on the property; however, water is not currently available. It is recommended that you enter Logsdon Cave during the dryer warmer months because it is wet and draws a great deal of cold air in the winter.
NOTICE: To help prevent the spread of the deadly White Nose Syndrome (WNS) affecting bat populations, please read the SCCi Cave Visitation Policy and follow the guidelines.
Preserve Information:

Acreage: Leased in Hart County, Kentucky
Property Manager: John Hoffelt (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Access: Permit required, contact the management committee for access.

The Lobelia Saltpeter Cave Preserve is located in Pocahontas County, WV. Lobelica Saltpeter Cave is a small but historically significant cave containing saltpeter works. The remains of a saltpeter water collection trough and wooden hand tools are the most significant artifacts found in the cave.
There are very few speleothems of note in any of the easily accessible sections of the cave.
Preserve Information:
Closures: 09/01 - 04/30 (Bat Hibernaculum)
Acreage
: 29.5 acres in Pocahontas County, West Virginia.
Preserve Management: Dave Cowan (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Access: Permit required. Visit permits.scci.org to request a permit.
Limrock Blowing is a three-mile-long stream cave with large walking passage, pretty rooms, and nice formations. Limrock is one of SCCi's most popular caves, and for good reason. This cave does flood in wet weather so be cautious when planning your visit.
Limrock Preserve includes the cave entrance and approximately 48 acres. The property is nice for hiking, photography, and bird watching.  Limrock Blowing Cave is Alabama’s 15th longest cave, with a surveyed length of 15,505 feet of primarily horizontal passage.
DO NOT park near the barn when visiting Limrock cave.  SCCi does not own the barn or the field beside it. If you park there, you car may be towed away. We have constructed a parking area on SCCi's property for use by visitors.  If there are too many cars and you cannot find an acceptable place to park, please go elsewhere and visit another day. Your cooperation is appreciated.
Limrock Nathan Williams
Limrock Blowing Cave, photo by Nathan Williams

When visiting the preserve, please park in the designated parking area on the SCCi property. Do not park at the barn or field uphill from the cave. Visitors are warned that in heavy rains the cave floods completely. SCCi requests that visitors not enter the cave when rain is in the forecast. Flooding can occur very quickly and with little or no warning!
Limrock Blowing Cave
Entrance to Limrock Blowing Cave on a cold winter day. Photo by Nathan Williams.

Please consider joining SCCi as a Sustaining Member.  For as little as $10 a month you can be a cave owner. For information on SCCi Sustaining Membership, see our Sustaining page. Regular memberships are also available for $25 per year.
NOTICE: To help prevent the spread of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) affecting bat populations, please read the SCCi Cave Visitation Policy and follow the guidelines to clean and disinfect your gear before and after visiting this cave.
Preserve Information:
Acreage: 48.34 acres in Jackson County, Alabama
Preserve Management Team: Tommy Royston (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Access: To request a permit, visit http://permits.scci.org
Maps: Buy a Piece of the Cave Map
Kennamer Cave Bob Biddix
Kennamer Cave, photo by Bob Biddix

The Preserve
The Kennamer Cave Preserve is one of the SCCi’s largest preserves in terms of acreage.  Situated along Kennamer Hollow in Jackson County, Alabama, the property runs from the valley floor, at the parking area, to the top of the plateau at the north end.  In between is a wide variety of habitat providing homes to a variety of bird and animal species.
Off the main road running up the Preserve, the property is extremely rugged.  To those making the effort, the property at the top end, around the upper cave entrances and above, is strikingly beautiful.  It is a miniature hanging valley with three seasonal streams running downhill to the main entrance.  In the Summer, the ravine at the main upper entrance has an abundance of ferns and is quite photogenic.  Hiking on the property is encouraged, although care should be taken during hunting season when approaching the boundaries of the Preserve.
The Cave
The cave is home to cave-dwelling species such as: tri-colored bats, several species of salamanders, troglobitic crayfish, bio-luminescent insects. Some sightings of TN cave salamanders have been reported in the lower pools.  Episodic flood pulses wash debris and the occasional surface dwelling species into the cave.
The main cave system is the heart of the Preserve.  It is an intermediate-level cave, with two entrances at the top (Main and Dug) and one useful entrance at the bottom (Orgy).  The upper and lower entrances are separated vertically by 150’ of elevation change.  Although much of the route from entrance to entrance is walking, some climbing and exposure is required to traverse the entire cave.  When going from the top down, ropes can be taken and rappelled/pulled down to ease several of the obstacles.
The best approach for sightseeing is to go in the Dug entrance at the top and tour down as far as you are comfortable and then go back out the same way.  That route will put you into the tall canyon section of the upper third of the cave and take you past the massive breakdown blocks known as Moby Dick.  The middle third of the cave is colorful and formation-rich, and has multiple short crawls connecting sections of walking passage.  Multiple spots can have seasonal waterfalls coming down some of the domes along the way.
The cave register is in a room located above the 40’ canyon.  Navigating this change in height is the most problematic part of the cave.  Below this feature, the cave is dominated by low passage requiring crawling.  There are several junctions in this stretch that confuse some first-time visitors.  This cave is a wonderful blend of scenery and athleticism and is one of the finest caves in Alabama.
The Preserve has at least two vertical pit options on the property.  Kenna Pit is a 120’ open air, free-fall pit to a large room.  Water runs across the floor at the very bottom of the room and continues down another drop to come out in the main Kennamer Cave.  Secret Pit is a 144’ open air, free-fall pit to a canyon-type room.  This pit is on the eastern slopes of the property, as opposed to all the other entrances.
Visiting
The Preserve parking area is located a mile down a dirt road behind a locked gate.  The gate combination is released on permit completion.  The first half of the road is currently in good shape, but the second half requires cautious driving or a high clearance vehicle.
From the parking area, hike up the main hollow on the old logging road.  The lower entrance (Orgy Entrance) is located about 0.2 miles from the parking area on the western side of the hollow.  The upper entrances (Main and Dug) are a mile hike from the parking area, with a 300+ foot elevation gain.  The trails to all entrances are well marked.  To get to Kenna Pit, follow the trail to the Orgy Entrance and continue up the ravine.  To get to Secret Pit, follow the main road north from the parking area, then take the first trail to the east up the ravine next to the stream, and curl back to the south on the established easement.
Preserve Information
Acreage: 227.1 acres in Jackson County, Alabama
Preserve Management Team: Mark Ostrander (Lead) (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Preserve Map: Cave Map

Permits: A permit is required to visit the preserve. Visit permits.scci.org. 
The Jennings Cave Preserve is located in Marion County, FL.
NOTICE: To help prevent the spread of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) affecting bat populations, please read the SCCi Cave Visitation Policy and follow the guidelines to clean and disinfect your gear before and after visiting this cave.
Preserve Information:

Acreage: 0.5 acres in Marion County, Florida
Preserve Management Team: Mike Gordon (Lead), Sean Roberts, Kitty Markley (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Access:  
To request a permit, visit http://permits.scci.org

Howard's Waterfall Cave is a nice, easy horizontal cave for novice and experienced cavers alike. Re-mapping by members of the Dogwood City Grotto in 1987 doubled the length of the cave. The cave has been heavily visited for many decades, and has suffered abuse and vandalism, including spray paint on the walls and destruction of formations.
The cave achieved national notoriety on April 16, 1966 in what was known as the Howards Cave Disaster. Gasoline vapors from a leaking service station line accumulated in the cave and ignited while a group of Boy Scouts were visiting the cave. Phillip Leighton Howell was one of the adults on the trip guiding the Scouts. Phillip was asked to assist on the Scout trip because of his familiarity with the cave and his maturity (he was 27 years old at the time of the accident and had served two tours as an intelligence officer in Southeast Asia in the years before the official start of the Vietnam War).  Phillip is credited with getting the three scouts trapped with him on the cave side of the explosion to a place where the air perhaps would be better. Local caver Rusty Mills entered the cave to help evacuate the Scouts and was overcome by fumes. Rusty Mills, Phillip Howell, and Benny Gilley (an attendant at a Trenton gas station) died in the accident while working to save the trapped Scouts. All of the Scouts survived. Rusty's Cave, located near Rising Fawn and now a part of the  SCCi Fox Mountain Cave Preserve, was located but not entered by Rusty shortly before his death. The cave was named in his honor and a plaque was placed at the entrance.
howards waterfall cave georgia

NOTICE: To help prevent the spread of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) affecting bat populations, please read the SCCi Cave Visitation Policy and follow these guidelines before visiting this cave.
Preserve Information:
Acreage: 1.25 acres in Dade County, Georgia
Preserve Management Team: Ben Eudy, Mike Hills, and Steve Davis (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Access: To request a permit, visit http://permits.scci.org. Use the Main Entrance Only, SCCi doesn't own other entrances.
 
howards waterfall cave georgia

Horse Skull cave is in Jackson County, AL.


NOTICE: To help prevent the spread of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) affecting bat populations, please read the SCCi Cave Visitation Policy and follow the guidelines to clean and disinfect your gear before and after visiting these caves.
Preserve Information:

Acreage: 40 acres in Jackson County, Alabama
Preserve Management Team: Andy Zellner (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Access
To request a permit, visit http://permits.scci.org
Preserve Map: Plot Map

The Holly Creek Cave Preserve near Iron City, TN is managed as a natural area and wildlife sanctuary to protect and preserve its unique attributes, including an important summer colony of endangered bats. SCCi and The Nature Conservancy of Tennessee (TNC) pooled their resources to buy this important gray bat cave. SCCi and The Nature Conservancy of Tennessee entered into a Memorandum of Understanding to share resources and expertise in joint cave conservation projects.  The preserve is being managed to preserve and protect the bats and other wildlife, and is closed from April 1 to September 15 to avoid disturbance of the summer bat colony.
One of SCCi's primary activities is the acquisition of caves through purchase, lease, easement, donation, or management agreements. Potential acquisitions are carefully evaluated. Presence of endangered plants or animals, significant geological and hydrological features, wilderness quality, threats from development or exploitation, and access issues all play a role in the evaluation process. SCCi also protects other gray bat cave in Tennessee, Alabama, and Georgia.  The cave will be managed for scientific study, but use will be limited during the summer months when the bats are in residence.
NOTICE: To help prevent the spread of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) affecting bat populations, you’ll need to follow the SCCi Cave Visitation Policy.
Preserve Information:

Acreage: 12 acres in Wayne County, Tennessee
Preserve Management Team: Shane Stacy (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Access
To request a permit, visit http://permits.scci.org


 
Hollow Ridge Cave is a few miles northeast of Marianna, Florida, in a small hill that rises about 40 feet above the Chipola River flood plain. The cave has four entrances and a surveyed length of 3,370 feet, making it one of the larger caves in the area. It is formed at the contact between the Marianna Limestone and the Bumpnose member of the underlying Crystal River Limestone. The cave's passages are a mixture of narrow fissures and muddy bedding plane crawls connecting several rooms. Many formations are found throughout the cave. The lower levers are subjected to frequent flooding.
Upper Entrance, Hollow Ridge Cave   Visitors are warned that during or following heavy rains the cave may flood. The SCCi recommends that cavers not enter the cave when rain is expected. Flooding can occur very quickly and with little or no warning!
The surface areas of the preserve are wooded, with abundant growth of pine, cedar, hickory, and other trees typical to the region. A small, grassy clearing at the top of the hill serves as a parking area for visitors. Near the back of the preserve there is a small quarry, long abandoned and now overgrown with cedars, ferns, and oak-leaf hydrangeas. The Chipola river lies about 1,500 feet to the west and is fed by many springs in the area. The parking area is reached by a short dirt road and driveway.   The donation of the property was complicated by overlapping boundary lines and related title issues.
Support the SCCi! Buy a Piece of a Cave Preserve! Your donation will be used to pay for all of the wonderful cave preserves we have recently purchased. You may select a specific preserve and you’ll receive a thank-you gift of your choice. To provide ongoing support, please consider signing up as a Sustaining Member. Our sustainers give us the monthly income we need to pay for our caves and to purchase new caves. You may also make a general donation to support our work across the southeast. We are able to purchase caves we all love because of YOUR support. Help us buy even more amazing caves in the future!
NOTICE: To help prevent the spread of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) affecting bat populations, please read the SCCi Cave Visitation Policy and follow the guidelines to clean and disinfect your gear before and after visiting this cave.
Preserve Information:
Acreage: 4.97 acres in Jackson County, Florida
Preserve Management Team: Allen Mosler (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Access:To request a permit, visit http://permits.scci.org
Due to the sensitive nature of this preserve, directions are provided to SCCi members only.
Gourdneck Cave Preserve
Gourdneck Cave Preserve, photo by Kelly Smallwood

On March 17, 1997, the final signatures were placed on a 25 year lease on Tennessee's Gourdneck Cave. The SCCi now has responsibility for the cave and has committed to maintain the waterline and delivery system for the cave owner. The lease is for the cave only, but we have permission to use a potion of the surface property for parking and access.
NOTE! As of 21 September 2006, visitors to Gourdneck Cave will have to provide their own means for descending and ascending the climb at the cave entrance. There is no longer a ladder in the entrance. Any ladders or other equipment left behind by visitors will be removed. Visitors are responsible for their own safety and for providing their own means for entering and exploring the cave.
Visitors are requested to use care to avoid damage to the water pipe, dam, and other components of the water system while on the property or in the cave. Also, the parking area is only large enough for a maximum of four vehicles. Please do not park on the road or on the neighbor's property. Everyone is friendly to us and we want to keep it that way. Car-pooling and keeping groups small will help
An information kiosk at Gourdneck Cave provides additional information about the cave and the SCCi, along with emergency contact information. Gourdneck preserve manager Maureen Handler may be contacted at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
Support the SCCi! Buy a Piece of a Cave Preserve! Your donation will be used to pay for all of the wonderful cave preserves we have recently purchased. You may select a specific preserve and you’ll receive a thank-you gift of your choice. To provide ongoing support, please consider signing up as a Sustaining Member. Our sustainers give us the monthly income we need to pay for our caves and to purchase new caves. You may also make a general donation to support our work across the southeast. We are able to purchase caves we all love because of YOUR support. Help us buy even more amazing caves in the future!
NOTICE: To help prevent the spread of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) affecting bat populations, please read the SCCi Cave Visitation Policy and follow the guidelines to clean and disinfect your gear before and after visiting this cave.
Preserve Information:
Acreage: Leased in Marion County, Tennessee
Preserve Management Team: Maureen Handler (Lead); Kristine Ebrey (This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)
Access: To request a permit, visit http://permits.scci.org

Preserve Management: Management Plan